"Wallace Fountain" or "Fontaine Wallace" (1872) by Charles-Auguste LeBourg  

 
 
DESCRIPTION: 
1,345-pound (610 kg), 106.7-inch (2.71 meters) high cast iron sculptural public fountain (inoperative)
DETAILS: 
This Wallace Fountain (more commonly known by the French term "Fontaine Wallace") is one of many throughout Paris, France and the world.  It was conceived by Sir Richard Wallace who was inspired by the Fontaine des Innocents.   Designed by sculptor Charles-Auguste LeBourg, this largest model was cast in 1872 by the Val D'Osne foundry.

HistoryWallace fountains are scattered throughout the city of Paris, France, mainly along the most-frequented sidewalks. They are named after the Englishman Richard Wallace, who financed their construction. A great aesthetic success, the public fountains are recognized worldwide as one of the symbols of Paris. A Wallace Fountain can be seen outside the Wallace Collection in London, the gallery that houses the works of art collected by Sir Richard Wallace and the first four Marquesses of Hertford.  
The Wallace Fountains have an octagonal pedestal on which four caryatids are affixed with their backs turned and their arms supporting a pointed dome decorated by dolphins.  Although this sculptural public fountain is not operative, it was designed to provide a slender trickle from the center of the dome which would fall down into a basin protected by a grille. To make distribution easier, there would have been two tin-plated, iron cups attached to the fountain by a small chain, staying always submerged for more cleanliness. In Paris these cups were removed in 1952 "for Hygiene reasons."  Source:  Wikipedia

LOCATION:  
intersection of Westwood Blvd. and Broxton Avenue, Westwood Village, Los Angeles, CA

THE PUBLIC ART:
©
 Public Art in Public Places Project

DETAIL:
©
 Public Art in Public Places Project

THE PUBLIC PLACE:
©
 Public Art in Public Places Project